Research‎ > ‎

Bioinspired Design



Freeze casting (ice templating) is a method used to produce porous materials with aligned porosity, simulating the structure of abalone nacre.  The porous scaffolds can be infiltrated with a molten metal or polymer to produce hybrid composites.
Adapted from:
  • Porter, M.M., J. McKittrick and M.A. Meyers, “Biomimetic materials by freeze casting,” JOM, 65, 720-727 (2013). DOI: 10.1007/s11837-013-0606-3

Contact: Steven Naleway (snaleway@eng.ucsd.edu)



This illustrates the lamellar wall and mineral bridge formation in freeze cast titanium dioxide.

Taken from:

  • Porter, M.M., R. Imperio, M. Wen, M.A. Meyers and J. McKittrick, “Bioinspired scaffolds with varying pore architectures and mechanical properties,” Advanced Functional Materials, 28, 1978-1987 (2014). DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201302958

Contact: Steven Naleway (snaleway@eng.ucsd.edu)




Magnetic field-assisted freeze casting. (a) A magnet was build around the freeze casting apparatus, with the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the ice growth direction,  (b) the field created alignment in the transverse direction, and epoxy was infiltrated into the ceramic scaffold (scanning electron micrographs), (c) the magnetic field alignment resulted in strength and stiffness twice that of the non-magnetic field freeze cast materials.
Taken from:
  • Porter, M.M., M. Yeh, J. Strawson, T. Goehring, S. Lujan, P.  Siripasopsotorn, M.A. Meyers, J. McKittrick, “Magnetic freeze casting inspired by nature,” Materials Science and Engineering A, 556, 741-750 (2012). DOI: 10.1016/j.msea.2012.07.058

Contact: Mike Frank (mbfrank@ucsd.edu)


(a) The narwhal tusk inspiration for rotating magnetic field-assisted freeze casting, (b) micro-computed tomography images of titanium dioxide scaffolds, showing channel alignment in field direction, and (c) shear stress-strain curves as a function of helical pitch, which is controlled by growth rate.  Torsional properties are enhanced from the rotating magnetic field.
Adapted from:
  • Porter, M.M., L. Meraz, A. Calderon, H. Choi, A. Chouhan, L. Wang, M.A. Meyers, J. McKittrick, “Torsional properties of helix-reinforced composites fabricated by magnetic freeze casting" Composite Structures, 119, 174-184 (2015). DOI: 10.1016/j.matdes.2010.03.029/

Contact: Mike Frank (mbfrank@ucsd.edu)



Bioinspired design based on the sea urchin mouthpiece (Aristotle’s lantern): (a) pink sea urchin and micro-CT images of Aristotle’s lantern; (b) rotated micro-CT views of Aristotle’s lantern and close up of an individual tooth; (c) mini-rover with bioinspired Aristotle's lantern sampler; (d) testing in a dry box environment with Mars-1A simulant.

Contact: Mike Frank (mbfrank@ucsd.edu)
Bioinspired "Aristotle's lantern"

Aristotle's Lantern and Bioinspired Side-by-Side

Rotating Aristotle's Lantern


The top video shows a side by side comparison of the sea urchin's mouth (Aristotle's lantern) opening and closing (left) with the bioinspired 3D printed design (right). The bottom video shows a micro-CT scan of the Aristotle's lantern rotating.

Contact: Mike Frank (mbfrank@ucsd.edu)





(a) Bony plates surrounding the seahorse tail, (b) plates slide, struts buckle under compression, (c) micro-computed tomography images input into CAD program. CAD program input into 3D printer. Springs and ball bearings simulate sliding & rotating joints, (d) bioinspired robotic arm segment that can bend and twist.


Contact: Joanna McKittrick (jmckittrick@eng.ucsd.edu)

 

(a) A photograph of a boxfish and a micro-computed tomography image of one of the plates, (b,c) bioinspired armor based on the penetration resistance of the boxfish carapace.



Contact: Steven Naleway (snaleway@eng.ucsd.edu)


Comments